Biomaterials and trustworthy sources

The Point 86 cover

Why materials from countries without strict quality control requirements are unacceptable for body jewelry Brian W Skellie,  APP Medical Director (published in issue 86 of The Point Journal of Body Piercing) Does it matter where a biomaterial we use comes from? Biomaterials made in the USA and in a short list of countries who maintain … Read moreBiomaterials and trustworthy sources

2016 BMXnet event interview on needles, steel and wound care

Here is a 22 minute interview that I did at BMXnet this year for Russian colleagues.
(In English with Russian subtitles)

The first question was: Can a professional piercers use a catheter?
The second question was about the use of steel for totally healed piercing.
The last question: What way of care is correct for a fresh piercing?

Unrelated, but interesting in light of the recent election and psychohistory:

http://www.newyorker.com/news/news-desk/when-newt-met-hari-seldon

seminars | UKAPP 2017

Come to the 2nd annual UKAPP seminars. Sunday 4th & Monday 5th at the Radisson Blu hotel in Birmingham England

See you there to share! I’ll be here just before BMXnet to help my colleagues further their organizational momentum!! It gives us great pleasure to announce the 2nd annual UKAPP seminars. Sunday 4th & Monday 5th at the Radisson Blu hotel just a 2 minute walk from Birmingham Moor street train station This year the UKAPP … Read moreseminars | UKAPP 2017

11 Things You Should Know About Piercings

“This article presented some sound information, but there’s still much more to know. When piercings are performed by a trained professional using sterile equipment and high quality jewelry, and appropriate aftercare is followed, the risks are drastically minimized.” — Elayne Angel, APP President

ASTM F136 revision

One of the most commonly used materials for body jewelry, the ASTM F136 – Standard Specification for Wrought Titanium-6Aluminum-4Vanadium ELI (Extra Low Interstitial) Alloy for Surgical Implant Applications (UNS R56401) has been revised to F136-13 developed by Committee F04.12, ASTM BOS Volume13.01.

The new version changes are in section 9. Special Requirements

Read moreASTM F136 revision

Safe steel for body jewelry?

 

A forum participant asked:

please discuss 316l and implant grade 316lvm grade stainless steel

They added a link to an essay titled
Body Jewelry Materials. Understanding Implant Grade Surgical Steel

The easy answer:

Neither are surgical implant materials. These are engineering specifications.
*AISI and SAE do not establish standards for biocompatibility.

me+.lMore detail: ASTM ? ANSI ? ISO

One thing to know is that ISO and ASTM are both international organizations for standards, but ISO is restricted to members of national standards bodies such as ANSI. Individuals or companies cannot become ISO members.

ASTM members are comprised of representatives of both government and stakeholders in related business, such as me. I joined ASTM in the mid 1990’s to represent the needs and learn more about the responsibilities of the body piercing business, and have been able to attend conferences, contribute my research based evaluations and vote for standards that affect us as body artists.

ISO voting is done for the US by ANSI. ASTM makes recommendations to ANSI. ANSI has typically voted in accordance with the recommendations of the ASTM.

The 2013 update that my ASTM F04.12 committee just voted to approve for the most common steel alloy for surgical implant is also most the commonly used for body jewelry, F138.

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ASTM F138-13a specifies chemical, mechanical and metallurgical refinements for 316 series steel alloys for surgical implant. It doesn’t really matter if the material is 316L, 316LVM, etc. The material is only acceptable for body jewelry when specified for human surgical implant and validated for this purpose to a peer reviewed scientific standard such as ASTM or ISO provides. AISI/SAE

As an aside: I don’t personally use steel alloy jewelry for initial piercings. I prefer pure unalloyed metals or simpler alloys with a greater margin of safety and less reactivity in the body.

Read moreSafe steel for body jewelry?

APP Conference soon!

  CONFERENCE IS ALMOST UPON US! THE CONFERENCE ADVANCED (ONLINE) REGISTRATION WILL SHUT DOWN AT MIDNIGHT ON MAY 17TH, PST ANY CHANGES TO YOUR REGISTRATION SHOULD BE MADE BEFORE THEN (OR WILL HAVE TO WAIT UNTIL WE ARE ONSITE IN LAS VEGAS) BANQUET DINNER SPONSORED BY INDUSTRIAL STRENGTH BODY JEWELRY; ANATOMETAL, INC.; LEROI, INC.; AND KAOS SOFTWEAR THURSDAY JUNE … Read moreAPP Conference soon!

Titanium body jewelry

Titanium!

What Titanium materials are best for body jewelry? My articles at http://jewelry.piercing.org/ and https://brnskll.com/shares/titanium-standards-why-not-g23/ explain that the two most effective Titanium standards are alloyed ASTM F136 and pure ASTM F67, the most common being the former as it is stronger, harder and easier to polish. Both are used for permanent surgical implants.

Returning explants to patients

Do not buy or sell used body jewelry brnskll dot com

An interesting observation on safety issues raised in returning contaminated items such as jewelry to clients, as voiced by this medical professional’s concerns for their patients. It is evident that infection control measures should be carefully considered when previously worn jewelry or other contaminated personal items are to be returned to a customer.

Please regard the discussion in the comments below


Question

I am an OR nurse and recently started a new job in a prestigious orthopedic hospital. At the request of a surgeon or patient when implants are removed we have been cleaning and flashing them and returning them to the patient in a plastic bag.

[NOTE: Flashing is an outdated term for sterilizing items unwrapped for immediate use]

Read moreReturning explants to patients

OPTIM 33TB protocol

OPTIM 33 TB is a One-Step Cleaner Disinfectant with no hazardous ingredients.

For the modern body artist, OPTIM offers a number of advantages for cleaning and thorough and safe disinfection in one minute for:

  • Temperature sensitive Body jewelry materials for healed piercings
    Such as wood, horn, stone, bone, certain polymers
    Break the chain of infection for MRSA, VRE, HCV, HBV, HIV, Mycobacteria and other pathogens for non-critical items that can not withstand the heat of an autoclave.
  • Tattoo machine frames, coils, springs, clip cords
  • Mayo trays and other work surfaces
  • Exam tables, massage tables, tattoo chairs
  • Display cases
  • Furniture in your waiting area including fabric covered items.
  • Suspension rigs and equipment

Read moreOPTIM 33TB protocol

Learn about piercing bumps

Have you noticed some sort of raised bump at the exit point of your piercing?

This could be due to a number of sources of irritation or infection that can result in overgrowth of scar tissue when the healing process is disrupted. There may be a single, simple solution though it commonly may take a combination of protective measures to help this turn out well.

Read moreLearn about piercing bumps

LESS THAN 30 DAYS UNTIL THE APP CONFERENCE!

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Less than 30 MORE DAYS UNTIL THE CONFERENCE!
ONLINE REGISTRATION CLOSES THIS WEEK!

Our 17th Annual Conference and Exposition will be in
Las Vegas, Nevada on June 17-June 22, 2012.

You need not be an APP member to attend the Conference!*

Read moreLESS THAN 30 DAYS UNTIL THE APP CONFERENCE!

How smooth is smooth enough? Surface finish standards for body jewelry

A superficial proposition:

I believe that professionals and clients have a right to know the roughness of the surface finish of body jewelry from each manufacturer they choose to do business with. Roughness can be measured as Ra to the microinch or Metric: nanometer. (The final smooth finish for many polished surgical implants is specified at 0.025µm to 0.05µm (1µin to 2µin)). This would alleviate a lot of confusion and allow a more frank discussion of the merits of different processes to arrive at a desired finish.

Smoother is better in our case, but how smooth is smooth enough?

Read moreHow smooth is smooth enough? Surface finish standards for body jewelry

World Standards Day at BMXnet

I am teaching Biomaterials standards for body art at the BMXnet conference in Essen, Germany this month for World Standards Day, the celebration of the birth of ISO October 14th, 1946. ASTM International will participate in the U.S. celebration of World Standards Day, sponsored by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) on Oct. 13 in Washington, D.C. This year’s … Read moreWorld Standards Day at BMXnet

Questionable jewelry project

Have you seen any body jewelry that made you wonder whether or not it was safe to wear?
Please add any manufacturer to this list who makes body jewelry that does not seem to meet appropriate safety standards. Our work group is collecting a list of examples for body jewelry review. You can email pictures, too. Your comments will be used in our ongoing project to help inform the public and improve body jewelry quality worldwide.

Read moreQuestionable jewelry project