Sterile gloves use rationale

Are you using sterile gloves for body piercing procedures? If you are not, using an Aseptic Non Touch Technique with sterile engineering controls to prevent client contamination is an alternative that you can use now with equipment that you already have. The burden of proof Fitness for purpose: Sterile gloves, be they exam or surgical are designed … Read more Sterile gloves use rationale

Bacterial Hand Contamination and Transfer after Use of Contaminated Bulk-Soap-Refillable Dispensers

American Society for Microbiology Bacterial Hand Contamination and Transfer after Use of Contaminated Bulk-Soap-Refillable Dispensers. Another reason not to refill bulk soap or antiseptic dispensers. Because of this is is particularly important to use single dose skin preparation solutions, as bulk dispensers post known problems.

President’s Corner The Point 69

As President of the Association of Professional Piercers, I have a regular editorial column in The Point magazine. Issue 69 editorial Some of the most fundamental ideas about piercing are those that are most intriguing and still relevant to question. What materials are available now to make jewelry for initial healing and prolonged wear in the … Read more President’s Corner The Point 69

Passing the buck on contaminated instruments, washer placement

Original article: December 2014 – CS Solutions. How this applies to body artists: Start the cleaning process for instruments right away in the procedure area at the point of use by wiping them off and wetting them with a foam enzyme cleaner product such as the all-in-ONE™ Surgical Instrument Cleaners and Conditioners. Transport the instruments to an … Read more Passing the buck on contaminated instruments, washer placement

“Didn’t Wash Hands” Alarm

Didn't Wash Hands alarm, Gary Larson — The Far Side

Our friends at the CDC created a helpful website about hand washing, which is worth the time to read through. I particularly appreciate their “Show me the science” section. ;) How to make your own “Didn’t Wash Hands” Alarm | MAKE. Big brother says, “wash your hands” More on Germ theory by How Stuff Works: Related: … Read more “Didn’t Wash Hands” Alarm

President’s Corner The Point 68

As President of the Association of Professional Piercers, I have a regular editorial column in The Point magazine. Issue 68 editorial As we approach our twentieth annual meeting, I reflect on the beginnings of the APP. When I discovered that a group—this group—had formed to take action and establish professional industry standards I was immediately interested … Read more President’s Corner The Point 68

Fantasy and Science Fiction: ‘Kiosk’ by Bruce Sterling | Beyond the Beyond | WIRED

The Fabrikator by Bruce Sterling

THE FABRIKATOR WAS UGLY, noisy, a fire hazard, and it smelled. Borislav got it for the kids in the neighborhood.

One snowy morning, in his work gloves, long coat, and fur hat, he loudly power-sawed through the wall of his kiosk. He duct-taped and stapled the fabrikator into place.

The neighborhood kids caught on instantly. His new venture was a big hit.

The fabrikator made little plastic toys from 3-D computer models. After a week, the fab’s dirt-cheap toys literally turned into dirt. The fabbed toys just crumbled away, into a waxy, non-toxic substance that the smaller kids tended to chew.

Borislav had naturally figured that the brief lifetime of these toys might discourage the kids from buying them. This just wasn’t so. This wasn’t a bug: this was a feature. Every day after school, an eager gang of kids clustered around Borislav’s green kiosk. They slapped down their tinny pocket change with mittened hands. Then they exulted, quarreled, and sometimes even punched each other over the shining fab-cards.

The happy kid would stick the fab-card (adorned with some glossily fraudulent pic of the toy) into the fabrikator’s slot. After a hot, deeply exciting moment of hissing, spraying, and stinking, the fab would burp up a freshly minted dinosaur, baby doll, or toy fireman.

Foot traffic always brought foot traffic. The grownups slowed as they crunched the snowy street. They cast an eye at the many temptations ranked behind Borislav’s windows. Then they would impulse-buy. A football scarf, maybe. A pack of tissues for a sneezy nose.

Once again he was ahead of the game: the only kiosk in town with a fabrikator….

via Fantasy and Science Fiction: ‘Kiosk’ by Bruce Sterling | Beyond the Beyond | WIRED.

The Fabrikator by Bruce Sterling

What is Aseptic Non Touch Technique ANTT?

Aseptic No Touch Technique may be used in conjunction with sterile gloves as an alternative to full surgical asepsis for body piercing procedures. I demonstrated variations on this with colleagues during the Versatility in Piercing Techniques series of workshops for the 2014 APP conference. The following is from ANTT.org:   What is Aseptic Non Touch Technique ANTT? ANTT is … Read more What is Aseptic Non Touch Technique ANTT?

How It’s Made – Hypodermic Needles

This is very similar to what I saw when I visited Industrial Strength LLC Sharp Ass Needles, without the hubs, followed by cleaning and chemical passivation. They are ready to be sterilized and used. We use 304 SST and keep on file for every lot of needles we make a passivation certificate. We also have an … Read more How It’s Made – Hypodermic Needles

Double pouching for sterile presentation? ATP use in CS? May 2014 – CS Solutions

From May 2014 – CS Solutions.

Double pouching for sterile presentation? ATP use in CS?

by Ray Taurasi

Q The OR requires that Sterile Processing double peel pouches all items sent to them. They claim this is essential to allow for sterile presentation to the sterile field. I cannot find anything in AAMI or AORN recommendations stating this is necessary. I find it strange that they have no issues with commercially prepared items they use from manufacturers that are all single packaged. Why should there be different packaging standards for items sterilized in-house versus commercially sterilized items?

A There are no AAMI or AORN recommendations that state you must double peel pouch items for use in the Operating Room. Both AORN and AAMI state that you should follow the manufacturer’s IFUs for any packaging materials. Their recommendations also advise that if a hospital chooses to double peel pouch they must be sure that the manufacturer has validated their pouches for double pouching.

Read moreDouble pouching for sterile presentation? ATP use in CS? May 2014 – CS Solutions

Somatic Piercing

Nick completed his Masters degree at the Ohio State University in Somatic and Cultural Studies in 2002. His final project, “Somatic Piercing: The Art and Ritual of Body Piercing” portrays his experiences in body rituals as well as illuminates other piercers’ views on the matter.

11 Things You Should Know About Piercings

“This article presented some sound information, but there’s still much more to know. When piercings are performed by a trained professional using sterile equipment and high quality jewelry, and appropriate aftercare is followed, the risks are drastically minimized.” — Elayne Angel, APP President

ASTM F136 revision

One of the most commonly used materials for body jewelry, the ASTM F136 – Standard Specification for Wrought Titanium-6Aluminum-4Vanadium ELI (Extra Low Interstitial) Alloy for Surgical Implant Applications (UNS R56401) has been revised to F136-13 developed by Committee F04.12, ASTM BOS Volume13.01.

The new version changes are in section 9. Special Requirements

Read moreASTM F136 revision

FDA Antiseptic sterility report

Sterility of Antiseptic Products:

FDA Investigates, Deliberates on Potential Recommendations

(Infection Control Today, PDF)
FDA investigates Antiseptics Sterility and potential recommendations_Page_01

In light of a number of high-profile recalls of contaminated alcohol prep products in the last several years, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is currently weighing whether or not to require sterility of patient skin prep products, specifically items such as alcohol prep pads used for injections, but it is not ruling out other surgical prep products.

On Dec. 12, 2012, the FDA held a hearing to receive expert testimony and public comment on how to address microbial contamination of these patient preoperative skin preparation drug products. It is a step in the ongoing investigational process that the agency is undertaking to determine issues related to sterility impacted by manufacturing processes.

An FDA spokesperson says that the panel members and FDA’s working group have received the submissions from the hearing and have been deliberating. FDA’s working group will be ready to make new recommendations in the coming months. The spokesperson adds that FDA’s working group has been soliciting clinician feedback from the FDA’s federal partners and other public health organizations, and that the agency will be ready to make new recommendations in the coming months.

Currently, patient preoperative skin preparations are not required to be sterile, since bacteria can contaminate these products at the time of manufacture or during product use. But because contaminated patient preoperative skin preparations have been associated with clinical infections and adverse outcomes, the FDA is exploring certain scientific and product-use issues related to patient preoperative skin preparations.

Patient preoperative skin preparations are over-the-counter (OTC) topical antiseptic drug products used to reduce the number of bacteria on the skin prior to medical procedures or injections. Although they are marketed predominantly to healthcare facilities, the use of these products extends beyond the healthcare facility setting.

Distilled water vs. saline soak; tears in wrapped sets; keeping instruments open for cleaning

December 2013 – CS Solutions. More insightful answers to infection control questions from Ray T. Surgical instruments should not be soaked in saline. Saline contains chloride ions which can be very damaging to surgical instruments. These chloride ions are highly caustic and can cause pitting and deterioration to instruments. (See figures 1 and 2.) For support … Read more Distilled water vs. saline soak; tears in wrapped sets; keeping instruments open for cleaning

Sacred cows in infection control

SSI Prevention: Evidence-Based Practices Replace Lingering “Sacred Cows’ in the OR
This report explores the prevention of surgical site infections (SSIs) within the context of evidence-based practices replacing “sacred cows” in the operating room. It focuses on the critical practice of preoperative hair removal.

When Thomas Paine noted in 1776 that, “A long habit of not thinking a thing wrong, gives it a superficial appearance of being right,” he could not have imagined that he was describing a current tug-of-war that still exists in some operating rooms today.

Safe steel for body jewelry?

A forum participant asked:

please discuss 316l and implant grade 316lvm grade stainless steel

They added a link to an essay titled
Body Jewelry Materials. Understanding Implant Grade Surgical Steel

The easy answer:

Neither are surgical implant materials. These are engineering specifications.
*AISI and SAE do not establish standards for biocompatibility.

me+.lMore detail: ASTM ? ANSI ? ISO ?

One thing to know is that ISO and ASTM are both international organizations for standards, but ISO is restricted to members of national standards bodies such as ANSI. Individuals or companies cannot become ISO members.

ASTM members are comprised of representatives of both government and stakeholders in related business, such as me. I joined ASTM in the mid 1990’s to represent the needs and learn more about the responsibilities of the body piercing business, and have been able to attend conferences, contribute my research based evaluations and vote for standards that affect us as body artists.

ISO voting is done for the USA by ANSI. ASTM makes recommendations to ANSI. ANSI has typically voted in accordance with the recommendations of the ASTM.

The 2013 update that my ASTM F04.12 committee just voted to approve for the most common steel alloy for surgical implant is also most the commonly used for body jewelry, F138.

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ASTM F138-13a specifies chemical, mechanical and metallurgical refinements for 316 series steel alloys for surgical implant. It doesn’t really matter if the material is 316L, 316LVM, etc. The material is only acceptable for body jewelry when specified for human surgical implant and validated for this purpose to a peer reviewed scientific standard such as ASTM or ISO provides. AISI/SAE

As an aside: I don’t personally use steel alloy jewelry for initial piercings. I prefer pure unalloyed metals or simpler alloys with a greater margin of safety and less reactivity in the body.

Read moreSafe steel for body jewelry?

Sponsorship for BMXnet 2013 infection control

My company Piercers.com and I are pleased to sponsor a Statim autoclave for sterilization at this year’s event again! I will be there to educate and to learn, as well as to sell infection control equipment and anodizers. The Statim 2000 G4 is on the way, and the new Optim 33TB Blue version for surface disinfection as well. — at Unperfekthaus for the BMXnet … Read more Sponsorship for BMXnet 2013 infection control

Researchers Develop Off-Grid Sterilization with Solar Steam

Original article: Researchers Develop Off-Grid Sterilization with Solar Steam.

Copyright 2013 by Virgo Publishing http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/
Posted on: 07/22/2013

Rice University graduate student Oara Neumann, left, and scientist Naomi Halas are co-authors of a new study about a highly efficient method of turning sunlight into heat. They expect their technology to have an initial impact as an ultra-small-scale system to treat human waste in developing nations without sewer systems or electricity. Photo by Jeff Fitlow/Rice University.

Read moreResearchers Develop Off-Grid Sterilization with Solar Steam