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body jewelry

A happy pierced person

11 Things You Should Know About Piercings

“This article presented some sound information, but there’s still much more to know. When piercings are performed by a trained professional using sterile equipment and high quality jewelry, and appropriate aftercare is followed, the risks are drastically minimized.” — Elayne Angel, APP President

No Holes Barred: A Piercee's Point of View

No Holes Barred: A PIERCEE’S POINT OF VIEW Article

You are a pierced woman, he said, looking into my eyes and smiling.
I lifted my head so that I could take a peek: Brian Skellie, my piercer, had successfully stabbed me with a needle so I could wear a silver ring with a hematite stone on my navel.

ASTM F136 Updated grain boundaries

ASTM F136 revision

One of the most commonly used materials for body jewelry, the ASTM F136 – Standard Specification for Wrought Titanium-6Aluminum-4Vanadium ELI (Extra Low Interstitial) …

me+.l

Safe steel for body jewelry?

A forum participant asked: please discuss 316l and implant grade 316lvm grade stainless steel. Body Jewelry Materials. Understanding Implant Grade Surgical Steel …

Association of Professional Piercers International Relations

APP Conference soon!

  CONFERENCE IS ALMOST UPON US! THE CONFERENCE ADVANCED (ONLINE) REGISTRATION WILL SHUT DOWN AT MIDNIGHT ON MAY 17TH, PST ANY CHANGES TO YOUR REGISTRATION SHOULD …

Titanium!

Titanium body jewelry

What Titanium materials are best for body jewelry? My articles at http://jewelry.piercing.org/ and http://brnskll.com/shares/titanium-standards-why-not-g23/ explain that the two most effective Titanium standards are alloyed ASTM F136 and pure ASTM F67, the most common being the former as it is stronger, harder and easier to polish. Both are used for permanent surgical implants.

Coated barbell with biofilm

Returning explants to patients

In developing a policy on the return of explants to patients [or previously worn body jewelry to clients] there are many concerns and issues that need to be considered and addressed.

Optim 33TB cleaning power

OPTIM 33TB protocol

A protocol for switching to OPTIM 33 TB One-Step Cleaner Disinfectant, and a Quick Reference Guide for Tattoo and Piercing use

bodymetal

Body Metal Font

Free Bodymetal typeface for my colleagues, clients and friends

World Standards Day at BMXnet

I am teaching Biomaterials standards for body art at the BMXnet conference in Essen, Germany this month for World Standards Day, the celebration of …

pe-lab-logo-synergy-reg-simple-1

Questionable jewelry project

Have you seen any body jewelry that made you wonder whether or not it was safe to wear?
Please add any manufacturer to this list who makes body jewelry that does not seem to meet appropriate safety standards. Our work group is collecting a list of examples for body jewelry review. You can email pictures, too. Your comments will be used in our ongoing project to help inform the public and improve body jewelry quality worldwide.

Anodizing is Awesome

Anodizing Titanium and Niobium Body Jewelry

The opportunity to explain and demonstrate anodizing titanium body jewlery to my colleagues in person is always a pleasure. For those of you who are interested, here are some of the basics. There are many other techniques, tips and tricks that I’ll be glad to help with if you have questions.

Ti: what can slip by undetected

Nonconforming Imported Titanium

This is a follow up to the presentation the FDA made to my ASTM International committee on nonconforming imported titanium. It should have met ASTM F136 for surgical implants, however the Quality Systems at the mill that melted it were inadequate. More information from the FDA and a bit of legal analysis.

Selected freehand piercings

Here is a look at a few recent piercings I performed during an exhibition for colleagues in New England. I really enjoy sharing ideas and techniques as a guest of my peers. My goal is an atraumatic aseptic technique: Primum non nocere

Why not G23 Titanium

Titanium standards: why not G23?

Please stop referring to body jewelry materials by overly vague and inappropriate standards. Using the term G23 for body jewelry materials is too superficial, and is not an implant standard.